Volodymyr Zelensky, President of Ukraine has said it is now difficult for him to believe the world.

President Zelensky said he can no longer believe reliability of “some countries or some leaders” following the invasion of his country by Russia.

Zelensky said when asked on CNN whether he finds the slogan “never again,” being used by most world leaders which is associated with Holocaust, now “hollow”, following alleged war crimes in Ukraine.

“I don’t believe the world. After we have seen what’s going on in Ukraine, we’ve — I mean that I don’t believe to this feeling that we should believe to the — to the — some countries or some leaders,” he said.

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“We don’t believe the words. After the escalation of Russia, we don’t believe our neighbours. We don’t believe all of this,” he said.

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Meanwhile, Russian forces have announced they would close the entry and exit to Ukrainian city of Mariupol starting on Monday

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The Russian military officials said that men remaining in the city would be “filtered out.”

The city’s mayor, according to his adviser, Petro Andriushchenko said the Russians had begun issuing passes for movement within the city.

He added that citizens will not be able to go out onto the streets or move between districts without one, according to CNN.

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